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Friday, 6 May 2016

The evolution of a predatory plant

By Nicola Temple

We keep a Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) in our bathroom. My son begged me for it, which inevitably means I look after it. Having seen these carnivorous little delights in the glasshouses at the University of Bristol Botanic Garden, I have learned that humidity and moisture are key to its happiness - hence it's bathroom location and its constant immersion in a tray of water.

The leaves of  the Venus flytrap, open (foreground) and
wrapped around its prey (background, right).
Photo credit: Shelby Temple
While I mostly leave my son to do the part he loves best - feeding - I can't deny my own fascination with it. The leaves, converted to ambush traps through evolution, have to have enough stimulation by an unsuspecting insect to warrant the plant investing the energy to snap the trap shut.  Once the trap is shut, the plant estimates the size of the prey based on the amount of stimulation of the sensory 'hairs' triggered by the trapped (and no doubt panicked) insect. If there is a sufficient signal from the sensory hairs, the plant starts to produce enzymes and proteins that will help it digest and absorb the prey. It's the stuff of nightmares...for the insect.

So what evolutionary steps transformed a leaf designed to harvest light from the sun into a leaf designed to trap prey? New research published this week in the journal Genome Research has provided some insight into the origins of the Venus flytrap's trap.

It's a leaf with a hint of root and a dash of...tongue?

Professors Rainer Hendrich and Jörg Schultz led a team of scientists from Julius-Maximilians-Universität Wüuzburg (JMU) in Bavaria, Germany who looked at the genes being expressed by the traps. They found that the traps not only had active genes typical of leaves, but also those typically found in roots.

A close up view of the trap, which shows the sensory 'hairs'.
Photo credit: Shelby Temple
There are dome-shaped glands on the surface of the trap. The outer layer of each gland secretes the digestive enzymes, but the middle layer has foldings that increase the surface area - reminiscent of microvilli in the human intestine. It is thought that this is where nutrient absorption takes place. As this is a major function of roots, it is not surprising that some of the same genes are required.

Now...about about that tongue. I mentioned above that the plant releases digestive enzymes if it receives enough stimulation within the closed trap. But what if the insect dies very quickly after being trapped? The plant has a receptor in the trap that can detect chitin - the main constituent of an insect's exoskeleton.  So even if the insect is no longer moving, the plant can 'taste' the insect in the trap and begin digesting.


Switching from defence to offence

When non-carnivorous plants come into contact with chitin, it is usually not going to turn out well for the plant -  they are under attack by herbivorous insects. Henrich and Schultz looked at the defence mechanism triggered by insects feeding on the non-carnivorous plant thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana). They found that the plant in defence mode activates the same genes in the same pattern as the Venus flytrap in attack mode.

"In the Venus flytrap these defensive processes have been reprogrammed during evolution. The plant now uses them to eat insects," explains Hedrich.

In both cases, mechanical stimulation (whether a chewing insect or a trapped one) generates an electrical impulse that activates the release of the hormone jasmonate. In Arabidopsis this hormone begins a cascade of events that starts the production of various chemicals that deter the insect or make the leaves hard to digest. In the Venus flytrap, however, jasmonate starts the digestion of the insect and uptake of the nutrients.

So, the ancestor of the Venus flytrap had all the machinery in place for detecting insects and triggering a chemical response to their presence, but evolution managed to shift it from a defensive strategy to a very effective offence.


Source: 

"Venus flytrap carnivorous life style builds on herbivore defense strategies", Felix Bemm, Dirk Becker, Christina Larisch, Ines Kreuzer, Maria Escalante-Perez, Waltraud X. Schulze, Markus Ankenbrand, Anna-Lena Keller Van der Weyer, Elzbieta Krol, Khaled A. Al-Rasheid, Axel Mithöfer, Andreas P. Weber, Jörg Schultz, Rainer Hedrich. Genome Research, DOI: 10.1101/gr.202200.115

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